Chapter: 24 – Children

01. The Mitzva of Ĥinukh, Educating One’s Children

It is a Torah commandment to teach Torah to children. Thus we read: “Teach them to your children” (Devarim 11:19). The primary objective of this teaching is to ensure that the children observe all the Torah’s instructions: “Study them and … Continue reading

Posted in 24 - Children | Comments Off on 01. The Mitzva of Ĥinukh, Educating One’s Children

02. Educating Children about Negative Commandments

It is a mitzva to train children to avoid prohibited activities from the time they begin to understand that certain things are permitted and certain things are prohibited. In other words, it is not enough that a child understands that … Continue reading

Posted in 24 - Children | Comments Off on 02. Educating Children about Negative Commandments

03. Who Is Obligated to Educate and Object?

According to some, the obligation of ĥinukh devolves equally upon the father and mother (Terumat Ha-deshen). However, most poskim maintain that only the father is obligated to train children to do mitzvot, that is, objecting when they transgress negative commandments … Continue reading

Posted in 24 - Children | Comments Off on 03. Who Is Obligated to Educate and Object?

04. The Prohibition for a Child to Turn Lights On and Off

If the lights went off in a home, and a child understands that his parents would be pleased if he would turn them back on, the parents must tell him not to do so. As we have already learned, parents … Continue reading

Posted in 24 - Children | Comments Off on 04. The Prohibition for a Child to Turn Lights On and Off

05. Permissive Rulings under Pressing Circumstances

Sometimes, under pressing circumstances, one may tell a minor to transgress a rabbinic prohibition, but one may never tell a minor to violate Torah law. First, as we saw regarding ĥinukh in general, the Torah forbids causing a child to … Continue reading

Posted in 24 - Children | Comments Off on 05. Permissive Rulings under Pressing Circumstances

06. A Child Is Comparable to a Sick Person

The Sages forbade a Jew to ask a non-Jew to do melakha for him on Shabbat. In contrast, if a child needs something very badly, his status is akin to that of one who is ill, for whom one may … Continue reading

Posted in 24 - Children | Comments Off on 06. A Child Is Comparable to a Sick Person

07. Permitted and Prohibited Games on Shabbat

It is a mitzva to educate children to study a great deal of Torah on Shabbat. It is thus proper to teach them to minimize game playing so that they will not get used to wasting the precious and holy … Continue reading

Posted in 24 - Children | Comments Off on 07. Permitted and Prohibited Games on Shabbat

08. Additional Games and Playing in the Yard

One may compress a spring on a toy car so that the car will move forward, as long as the car does not make noise and no lights light up. One may not play with any battery-operated toy (17:2 above). … Continue reading

Posted in 24 - Children | Comments Off on 08. Additional Games and Playing in the Yard

09. Ball Games and Running

Children may not play soccer, football, baseball, or basketball on Shabbat. Since adults make a big deal out of these games and they have intricate rules and procedures, they are prohibited, as they are considered a prohibited weekday activity. Besides, … Continue reading

Posted in 24 - Children | Comments Off on 09. Ball Games and Running

10. Bicycles, Scooters, and Skates

One may not ride a regular two-wheeler bicycle, because this is a weekday activity (22:8 above). Even if a bicycle has training wheels, one may not ride it. However, small children may ride tricycles, because tricycles are only used by … Continue reading

Posted in 24 - Children | Comments Off on 10. Bicycles, Scooters, and Skates