Chapter: 02 – Positive Yom Tov Obligations

01. Preparations

Just as there is a mitzva on Shabbat to honor it (kavod) and to make it a delight (oneg), so too there is a mitzva to honor and delight in Yom Tov (above, 1:7-8). Therefore, everything which the Sages instructed … Continue reading

Posted in 02 - Positive Yom Tov Obligations | Comments Off on 01. Preparations

02. Candle Lighting

Just as the Sages ordained candle lighting for Shabbat, so they ordained candle lighting for Yom Tov. Lighting candles honors the festival and adds joy to the meal. Since this is a mitzva, a berakha is recited: “Barukh ata Hashem … Continue reading

Posted in 02 - Positive Yom Tov Obligations | Comments Off on 02. Candle Lighting

03. The Yom Tov Amida

The Amida on Yom Tov (the following describes all prayers, except for Musaf, of all holidays except Rosh Ha-shana) has seven berakhot, just like the Amida for Shabbat. The formulations of the first three and last three berakhot are the … Continue reading

Posted in 02 - Positive Yom Tov Obligations | Comments Off on 03. The Yom Tov Amida

04. The Amida When Yom Tov Coincides with Shabbat

When Yom Tov and Shabbat coincide, the Amida is that of Yom Tov, with Shabbat-specific insertions. Each time both Shabbat and Yom Tov are mentioned, Shabbat is mentioned first, as it is both holier and more frequent. The conclusion of … Continue reading

Posted in 02 - Positive Yom Tov Obligations | Comments Off on 04. The Amida When Yom Tov Coincides with Shabbat

05. Kiddush and the Festive Meal

On Yom Tov night, just as on Friday night, there is a mitzva to recite kiddush over a cup of wine, at the site of the festive meal. The Sages ordained that the sanctity of the day be invoked in … Continue reading

Posted in 02 - Positive Yom Tov Obligations | Comments Off on 05. Kiddush and the Festive Meal

06. Birkat Ha-mazon

On Yom Tov, Ḥol Ha-mo’ed, and Rosh Ḥodesh, the Sages ordained that the sanctity of the day be invoked in Birkat Ha-mazon, as eating on these holy days is not the same as eating during the week. It is endowed … Continue reading

Posted in 02 - Positive Yom Tov Obligations | Comments Off on 06. Birkat Ha-mazon

07. Hallel

It is a mitzva to thank and praise God for the festivals He gave us; we therefore recite Hallel. However, Hallel is not said on every festival. There are three requirements which must be met for Hallel to be said: … Continue reading

Posted in 02 - Positive Yom Tov Obligations | Comments Off on 07. Hallel

08. Torah Reading on Yom Tov and Ḥol Ha-mo’ed

An ordinance from the time of Moshe Rabbeinu mandates reading the Torah every Monday, Thursday, and Shabbat, so that three days never go by without a public Torah reading (BK 82a). Over the course of time, the custom developed to … Continue reading

Posted in 02 - Positive Yom Tov Obligations | Comments Off on 08. Torah Reading on Yom Tov and Ḥol Ha-mo’ed

09. The Musaf Amida and Ve-te’erav

The three prayer services that we recite each day correspond to the three patriarchs as well as to the daily sacrifices in the Temple. Shaḥarit and Minḥa correspond to the two daily (tamid) offerings in the morning and afternoon, respectively, … Continue reading

Posted in 02 - Positive Yom Tov Obligations | Comments Off on 09. The Musaf Amida and Ve-te’erav

10. Reading the Megillot

The Sages state in a beraita in Masekhet Sofrim (14:1) that over the course of the year we publicly read all five megillot (scrolls): Shir Ha-shirim on Pesaḥ, Rut on Shavu’ot, Eikha on Tisha Be-Av, Kohelet on Sukkot, and Esther … Continue reading

Posted in 02 - Positive Yom Tov Obligations | Comments Off on 10. Reading the Megillot

11. Havdala

Just as there is a mitzva to make havdala at the end of Shabbat, so too there is a mitzva to do so at the end of Yom Tov, giving verbal expression to the difference between the sanctity of Yom … Continue reading

Posted in 02 - Positive Yom Tov Obligations | Comments Off on 11. Havdala

12. When Yom Tov Follows Shabbat

When Yom Tov begins as Shabbat departs on Saturday night, we must take care not to prepare on Shabbat for Yom Tov. Shabbat is meant to be holy and restful, not a day to prepare for another day. Making efforts … Continue reading

Posted in 02 - Positive Yom Tov Obligations | Comments Off on 12. When Yom Tov Follows Shabbat

13. Isru Ḥag

It is a good custom to eat and drink a little more than usual on the day following a festival (Rema 429:2), since the aura of the festival spills over into it. In the Yerushalmi, this day is referred to … Continue reading

Posted in 02 - Positive Yom Tov Obligations | Comments Off on 13. Isru Ḥag