07. Cooking More Yom Tov Food than Needed

Even though a Yom Tov meal can be enjoyed with only one dish, one who wishes to enhance his simḥa of Yom Tov may cook many different dishes, as is standard when preparing the most sumptuous of meals.

One who prefers challah fresh from the oven may bake additional challah on Yom Tov, even though he already has day-old challah (MB 506:37). However, since lighting a new fire on Yom Tov is forbidden, he may not turn on the oven. Therefore, a timer (“Shabbos clock”) should be set before Yom Tov to turn on the oven at the appropriate time (see 5:7 below).

One may prepare labor-intensive food on Yom Tov, such as dumplings made from filo dough. He may also cook fruit to make it tastier, even if it can be eaten raw. In general, one may exert effort to improve food’s taste or aroma.

One who wants to dip his challah in gravy may cook meat on Yom Tov in order to produce gravy, since he has no other way to obtain it.

Since a new fire may not be lit on Yom Tov, a candle is lit before Yom Tov, and on Yom Tov that flame is used to kindle the gas burner upon which one can cook. Extinguishing the burner after cooking should be accomplished via grama (an indirect action) or by having the gas on a special timer, as explained below (5:5).

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Translated By:
Series Editor: Rabbi Elli Fischer

The Laws of Shabbat (1+2) - Yocheved Cohen
The Laws of Prayer - Atira Ote
The Laws of Women’s Prayer - Atira Ote
The Laws of Pesach - Joshua Wertheimer
The Laws of Zemanim - Moshe Lichtman

Editor: Nechama Unterman